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  • Nepean, Ontario, Canada

Pizza One-Two-Three

Hello! I’m Jorryn Yapadi, a first-year student in Nanotechnology Engineering at the University of Waterloo. I have been working on a 2D mathematics-based game in collaboration with a group of other university students.

Game Overview

Introduction Screen

Pizza One Two Three is a serious educational game designed to introduce students to fractions. The game is an introduction to fractions, and has been designed based on the Ontario Math Curriculum (2020). The game starts with a basic lesson about fractions and tests the student’s knowledge of the concepts. In the tutorial, students are taught that fractions are represented by a numerator and denominator. They move on to the game portion, where they are tasked with identifying the correct fraction for customers. Below are some features of the gameplay.

Kitchen Screen

This is the kitchen screen. The player is first given a blank pizza with a set of toppings that they must include on the pizza. These are shown on the left side of the screen (image right): pesto, cheese, olives, and tomato sauce. To place them on the pizza, the player must click on the glove icon, then the topping of choice, and click on the pizza to apply. The spoon tool is for removing toppings.

When they have finished adding toppings, they would click on the pizza cutter tool on the right.

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This is the pizza cutting screen. The pizza is subdivided into twelve sections, and the player must click on the two lines pertaining to the fraction that is displayed.

In this case (see image left), the fraction is 7/12, so the player selected two lines which contain 7/12 of the pizza. The yellow “+” signs have been added to indicate which pieces have been selected. Successfully completing a round includes having the correct toppings and slicing the correct fraction of the pizza as required.

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Personal Highlights

Script to Select Object from List

1. Topping Text

One of my tasks was to develop the system which the toppings that the players must add. I accomplished this by having the game pick a string object from a list upon the click of a button on the Round End screen, and assigning it to a variable. I had to make sure to create an empty game object on Unity to attach to the button in order for this call action to work.

I then called the variable in another script to display in that text box. I did this twice – one for the first text (Tomato Sauce or Pesto) and one for the second below it (Cheese or Olives).

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In this example (image right), I had the first round default to “Tomato Sauce” using an if-else regarding the empty variable, but after some testing it evidently wouldn’t register as a game-recognized topping because it wasn’t stored in the variable, so a quick bugfix I did was creating another script attached to the trigger BtnAction(), except this time I attached it to the “Continue” button at the very end of the Tutorial, so that the very first round will have topping text that is recognized as a topping requirement by the game. This is whon in the image below, replacing the else statement in the text display script.

I then worked with William Quigley and Sachit Singh on the game recognition of these toppings using a counter system. See their profiles for further details on this.

Bugfix for First Round

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Sibelius and Noteperformer

2. Music and Sound Effects

In addition to the topping system, I composed all the sound files for the game as the Sound Artist. I used Sibelius, a notation-based composition software, paired with Noteperformer, a sound realization system that can be integrated into the former. In total, I composed three music files for the game, each over a minute in length and used in separate areas of the game – the login screen, the tutorial, and the gameplay.

I also composed the sound effects in the game – some of them using Sibelius, and the rest through manual recording with a microphone. One example is recording the sound effect for adding toppings, which I accomplished by scratching an object across a wooden table, giving it a refined “flick” sound.

All music and sound effects were done through thoughtful planning and detailed discussion with my fellow team members, as well as interchange of ideas and feedback, trial and error, and refinement of sound files into the best supported format with sound-mixing edits.

Game Administration Document

3. Technical Design Documents

Lastly, I worked with Humnah Younus in the beginning stages of the project to complete the Game Administration Document, which instructs parents, teachers, and users in registration and other requirements/recommendations to be aware of while engaging with our product, as well as the Game Story Document, which informs our team of the summary and details of the inner workings and display of the game.

These documents are updated as our team discussed and made changes to the project, which included anything from appearance changes to mechanical changes, and even the core purpose of the game.

Here are some sample instructions from our document (see image left).

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Gantt Chart